Brands now turn to micro-influencers, and there’s a big chance you are one of them

Anybody with a genuine following of 500 people is welcome to our Influencer Campaigns. Expect to get paid for liking, sharing or commenting on brand’s posts – stuff you did for free until now. And don’t worry about your job, you won’t have to stay online longer than you currently do.

 

Digital influencers have been around us for more than a decade, but brands still have much to learn about using them. Instead of paying Kim Kardashian $250.000 for a post, they could be better off using people like you.

What came first, the influencer or the brand?

Before 2004, brands used celebrities, characters or even royalty as brand ambassadors. The desired effect was to become relatable, reach more people and reinforce brand values. Then Internet democratized influence. Regular people could reach massive followings just by talking online about stuff they were interested in.

Targeting people with specific shared interests became effortless. If they were after yoga fans, they could work with someone who has a yoga YouTube channel. And word of mouth was guaranteed.

Brands made influencers grow to the point some can no longer afford them

The problem is that influencers from 2004 have grown up, and so did their audience. Better reach and flawless content come with a comparative price tag. Some of the people who are doing this professionally now have millions of followers, getting paid with over $100.000 per post. That makes them off limits for brands with smaller budgets.

That’s where micro influencers come in, people with a smaller following than what we conventionally call influencers. People from Tribe say it’s anyone with more than 3k followers, Hypertly says it’s from 1k up and for Mavrck it’s people that have between 500 and 5k followers. We’re counting in anyone who has more than 500 followers.

Brands can use 100 micro influencers for the price of a top influencer since the price per post is less than $100  for people with less than 1.000 followers.

When in doubt, look at the numbers

Engagement is calculated by dividing their total number of actions (likes, shares and comments) by their total number of followers. Here, micro-influencers have the upper hand.

The average engagement rate for micro-influencers is 15.1%, dropping continuously as follower count increases: 7.4% for 1-9.9k followers, 3.3% for 10-99k followers and 2.4% for 100k+ followers according to Influence.co. Like rates look good too: micro-influencers have a like rate of 8%, dropping to 4% for the 1-10k follower category and then dropping further as follower rate increases (Digiday).

The cost per engagement – budget divided by the total number of likes, comments and shares – also seems to be smaller with micro-influencers. If we listen to Tribe, a good cost per engagement is 40 cents or below. Unilever managed to get to 21 cents and 26 cents in two micro-influencer campaigns for their Stork spread, using the Tribe platform.

Having what it takes

You have influence, only it’s harder for brands to get to you: traditionally, micro-influencers have to flash brand hashtags and hope to get noticed. SETHER will bridge the gap between hidden micro-influencers and brands that need them.

The exact things that you think prevent you from being an influencer make you a great micro influencer. Perfect images created by top influencers are pretty but they are not a one-size-fits-all solution. Sometimes a less than perfect yet authentic picture is more relatable. Only posting for your friends and family makes you more trustworthy and engaging.

Anybody with a genuine following of 500 people is welcome to participate in the SETHER Influencer Campaigns. Expect to get paid for liking, sharing or commenting on brand’s posts – stuff you did for free until now. And don’t worry about your job, you won’t have to stay online longer than you currently do.